SQL Server Error 823 Troubleshooting and Resolution

SQL Server Error 823

If you are getting this error, chances are you are having a hardware failure on your server, or perhaps someone deleted one of the database files.

Assuming you took care of that situation:

Do not Detach the Database

The very easy fix to do is to simply restore the database using your backups. But if you don’t have a good set of backups, Paul Randal ( he and his wife Kim, are SQL GODS) has a great set of steps to try in his article here.

Here is the short story of how to get your database up and running if your transaction log was damaged.

Error 823 Resolution

Switch the database into the emergency/single-user mode:

alter database <dbname> set emergency;
go
alter database <dbname> set single_user;
go
dbcc checkdb(‘<dbname>’,REPAIR_ALLOW_DATA_LOSS) with all_errormsgs, no_infomsgs;
go
alter database <dbname> set multi_user;
go
alter database <dbname> set online;
go

The main thing to realize here is that if the transaction log is damaged or missing that the transactions are not going to be found in the transaction log. You are going to lose any active transactions that have not been commited to the database. The real area of interest is the REPAIR_ALLOW_DATA_LOSS. This particular arguement allows you to recreate the transaction log. Do not take this command lightly as it will lose data, so please use it only as a last resort.

 

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DBA Test/Development Server Best Practices

These are things I learned from a hardware failure of a test server (you might also call it a staging area). So what’s the big deal? Developers should have all their code checked into source control and nothing critical should be on there right?

Sadly no. These are things you should do on your test server to limit your exposure as a DBA.

1. Treat the server as a production server. This includes transaction log backups, backups of user accounts, SSIS, SSRS, SQL Agent jobs, and Windows Tasks.

2. Trust, but verify. Trust the developers to be following best practices, after all your job is to make the company money and so is theirs. Periodically issue correspondence with the developers to verify that nothing is running in a production manner.

3. Get a good snapshot/system image from time to time. If someone or something destroys your server, you have something to fall back upon. This is especially true when developers are creating lots of dependencies in their code to OS level libraries.